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December 2017 Fire and Wine


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Mother Nature did much to step up harvest season this year. Warm weather in late August and early September combined with heat spikes led to an early harvest. As a result, 90 percent of the grapes were harvested before the fires.
The remaining grapes on the vines were mostly tough-skinned Cabernet Sauvignon. Though it’s premature to discuss smoke taint on the grapes that were remaining on vines after the fires, many vintners believe Cabernet can withstand smoke in the short term, according to Jean Arnold Sessions, executive director of Sonoma County Vintners. What’s more, smoke is not an issue for wine that’s fermenting or already bottled.  But can fire impact the taste of wine? “Any major temperature variation could affect the taste of wine,” says Sessions. “Extreme heat such as fire is one example. As for the recent fires, more than 90 percent of our Sonoma County Vintners winery members had little or no fire damage to their wineries, so the quality of the wine won’t be impacted.”
There are about 1,200 wineries in Mendocino, Napa and Sonoma counties, and in the regions most impacted, its reported that less than 10 have been destroyed or heavily damaged. What’s the best way to support growers and wineries? “One of the best ways to support our beautiful, diverse and vast region is to visit the open tasting rooms,” says Sessions. “And an even easier option is to continue drinking Sonoma County wines from wherever you are. Together, our wine community will emerge stronger and more connected.” To purchase wines directly from Sonoma County Vintner members, visit sonomawine.com/sonoma-county-wineries.
 

Sonoma Strong

Sonoma County is home to more than 450 wineries, growing 60 varieties, across 17 different Appellations.  There are numerous fundraising campaigns to help with wildfire recovery. Sonoma County Vintners supports the Sonoma County Resilience Fund, a fund managed by Community Foundation Sonoma County that provides mid-  to long-term resources to those impacted by the fires. For more information and to make a donation, go to www.sonomacf.org/sonoma-county-resilience-fund.
 
Mother Nature did much to step up harvest season this year. Warm weather in late August and early September combined with heat spikes led to an early harvest. As a result, 90 percent of the grapes were harvested before the fires.
The remaining grapes on the vines were mostly tough-skinned Cabernet Sauvignon. Though it’s premature to discuss smoke taint on the grapes that were remaining on vines after the fires, many vintners believe Cabernet can withstand smoke in the short term, according to Jean Arnold Sessions, executive director of Sonoma County Vintners. What’s more, smoke is not an issue for wine that’s fermenting or already bottled.  But can fire impact the taste of wine? “Any major temperature variation could affect the taste of wine,” says Sessions. “Extreme heat such as fire is one example. As for the recent fires, more than 90 percent of our Sonoma County Vintners winery members had little or no fire damage to their wineries, so the quality of the wine won’t be impacted.”
There are about 1,200 wineries in Mendocino, Napa and Sonoma counties, and in the regions most impacted, its reported that less than 10 have been destroyed or heavily damaged. What’s the best way to support growers and wineries? “One of the best ways to support our beautiful, diverse and vast region is to visit the open tasting rooms,” says Sessions. “And an even easier option is to continue drinking Sonoma County wines from wherever you are. Together, our wine community will emerge stronger and more connected.” To purchase wines directly from Sonoma County Vintner members, visit sonomawine.com/sonoma-county-wineries.
 
Mother Nature did much to step up harvest season this year. Warm weather in late August and early September combined with heat spikes led to an early harvest. As a result, 90 percent of the grapes were harvested before the fires.
The remaining grapes on the vines were mostly tough-skinned Cabernet Sauvignon. Though it’s premature to discuss smoke taint on the grapes that were remaining on vines after the fires, many vintners believe Cabernet can withstand smoke in the short term, according to Jean Arnold Sessions, executive director of Sonoma County Vintners. What’s more, smoke is not an issue for wine that’s fermenting or already bottled.  But can fire impact the taste of wine? “Any major temperature variation could affect the taste of wine,” says Sessions. “Extreme heat such as fire is one example. As for the recent fires, more than 90 percent of our Sonoma County Vintners winery members had little or no fire damage to their wineries, so the quality of the wine won’t be impacted.”
There are about 1,200 wineries in Mendocino, Napa and Sonoma counties, and in the regions most impacted, its reported that less than 10 have been destroyed or heavily damaged. What’s the best way to support growers and wineries? “One of the best ways to support our beautiful, diverse and vast region is to visit the open tasting rooms,” says Sessions. “And an even easier option is to continue drinking Sonoma County wines from wherever you are. Together, our wine community will emerge stronger and more connected.” To purchase wines directly from Sonoma County Vintner members, visit sonomawine.com/sonoma-county-wineries
 
 

Raise Your Glass!

The Stag’s Leap District is a small but powerful appellation, tucked into the legendary Silverado Trail in Napa. The hillsides of Stag’s Leap have become a home for the region’s Cabernet Sauvignon vineyards, and every winery in the area makes at least one vintage each year.

To celebrate the holiday season, the winemakers of Stag’s Leap have banded together to provide The Appellation Collection, a series of 17 Cabernet Sauvignons—one from each of the region’s famed wineries. The 2014 vintages come from Baldacci Family Vineyards, Chimney Rock Winery, Cliff Lede Vineyards, Clos Du Val, Ilsley Vineyards, Lindstrom Wines, Malk Family Vineyards, Odette Estate Winery, Pine Ridge Vineyards, Quixote Winery, Regusci Winery, Shafer Vineyards, Silverado Vineyards, Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars, Stags' Leap Winery, Steltzner Vineyards and Taylor Family Vineyards. Only 150 sets are available.

To support relief efforts after the wildfires, $100 from every purchase of the $1,999 collection will go to the Napa Valley Community Foundation’s Disaster Relief Fund for fire victims. The best way to support a region in its time of need is to find a winery that contributes part of every sale to its community. Buy Napa’s best wine; give to Napa’s people. That makes for the perfect gift.

https://www.stagsleapdistrict.com/appellation_collection.php



 

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