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  Cover Story

May 2017
Modern Matriarchs

Matriarchs have been a force since biblical times, but these days, they do more than head families and lead tribes. They’re creative thinkers and innovators who face challenges and take advantage of the opportunities that come their way to build successful businesses. Their worldview includes family, friends and relationships as well as the bottom line. And in the North Bay, they’re resourceful women who are racking up some impressive accomplishments.

Feature stories

In the Name of Love

Women get stuff done. Some receive high-profile recognition for their efforts, while others work under the radar, quietly making a difference in the lives of people who can use a little help. Here are three North Bay women changing the world around them.


Sharing the Secrets of Success

What’s special about women-owned businesses? Do certain businesses—and not others—lend themselves to female proprietorship?  NorthBay biz takes a look at six local businesses that have something special about them—something you can’t see, or won’t find on a ledger. But chances are you can feel the difference when you walk in the door. Whether it’s a clothing boutique or a sheet metal company, we found an essential set of qualities that these diverse business women share. These qualities, in new and well-established careers, bring forth success, customer loyalty and employee dedication. Here are six women, in six very different businesses, who offer insight into their success.


Wine Women

In 1886, Josephine Tychson founded and built a winery and made vino in St. Helena, making her the first woman to own and operate a winery in California. Today, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon producer Freemark Abbey resides in Tychson’s former winery. By 1890, 10 percent of lead winemakers were women in California and surprisingly, that percentage hasn’t changed, according to a 2015 report from Santa Clara University.


Street Eats

America has a long history with mobile food. Some might say it started in the 1860s with chuck wagons traversing the Old West. The 1950s brought ice cream trucks, followed by the 1960s “roach coaches.” Taco trucks, more closely resembling the food trucks we’re familiar with today, become popular in the Los Angeles area in the 1970’s. About 10 years ago, when the recession hit hard, a demand for cheap eats, and more affordable venues over brick-and-mortar sites spurred a movement. By around 2008, food trucks started to take off, with social media playing an instrumental role in the rapid growth and success of this unique business endeavor.


Columns

Monthly Features

Special Features

bonus issue

In addition to our 12 monthly issues, NorthBay biz produces four special bonus issues during the year. A annual perspective on the North bay county by county,  The NorthBay biz 500, a compilation of the top 500 revenue producing companies is published in February. In May our annual readers' poll of the best companies doing business in the North Bay hits the newsstands. And Finally our special NorthBay biz Wine/Harvest Fair issue is published in October.
So that means NorthBay biz' insightful business analysis, comments, special features and columnists are available 16 times every year for our 55,000+ readers to enjoy.

NorthBay Perspective

 

In this Issue

Modern Matriarchs

Matriarchs have been a force since biblical times, but these days, they do more than head families and lead tribes. They’re creative thinkers and innovators who face challenges and take advant...

In the Name of Love

Women get stuff done. Some receive high-profile recognition for their efforts, while others work under the radar, quietly making a difference in the lives of people who can use a little help. Her...

Wine Women

In 1886, Josephine Tychson founded and built a winery and made vino in St. Helena, making her the first woman to own and operate a winery in California. Today, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon produc...

See all...